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  • joanne
    Posts: 13
    :Hello my name is joanne my son is dylan age 5 he is at mainstream school with a fulltime support worker with him, they say a lot of the time he is on his own agenda being non-compliant but also he can join in if HE wants to. He does play nicely with the other children in class but it has to be on his terms. If pushed he can react with violent outbursts which normally gets him removed from the classroom to keep the other children safe and at times two assistants have to hold him to protect themselves from being kicked bit etc. The school have been trained in using team teach (possitive handling) but Ijust down"t like the idea of it .am I on my own with this for dylan only being five or is this the norm? from.joanne of norfolk
  • Pamela
    Posts: 205
    hello Joanne...The team teach method has been used on Olivia recently in the home setting by me and a headmaster from a local school. It is the only way that we can remove Olivia for her safety and the safety of anyone within punching and kicking distance! I think if was used when she was smaller then her melt downs might not have been as severe as they are now. She will be 11 this year and is already too strong for me. It frightens me to think how I will cope in the future. After a meltdown she is exhausted and withdraws from 'our world' and will stim in different ways. Either by rocking, scratching at the carpet, or humming. Only when she is ready will she 'come back' as if nothing has ever happened!
    Pamela
  • Just Dandy
    Posts: 19
    Hi Joanne
    The staff that dealt with my son in the infant school were taught this and I must say I wasn't very happy about it at the time. With Daniel I didn't feel it was necessary if they just gave him some time out to calm down from a situation. The teacher he had in yr2 was brilliant and he had places he could go to when he became really anxious and couldn't cope with a situation. It was agreed with him the places that he could go sometimes it was just to go behind a screen in the classroom or a corner. At times he went out of the class to the cloakroon just opposite and from there he was kept an eye on but left alone he went back to class on his own and was fine. Let's face it it is really anxiety that best describes how they feel and if it was me and people kept on and on at me I would want to lash out too. This happened with Daniel when he was pushed and he was excluded fo a day but theHead couldn't tell me what led up to it and how it was dealt with. He is now at the Junior school and they would have adopted a similar approach, theres was a red card which they used with another SEN child. When he felt it all too much they suggested he would put the card on the teachers desk and go t a previously agreed place fo time out. Luckily he hasn't had to do this as with full time ECO support he is coping much better.
    Maybe at 5 he is to young for some of the approaches but I think time out of some sort would work. Do you have a behaviour support worker that helps the staff with strategies etc if you have speak to them and raise your concerns. If there's something you do at home that works tell them. You know him best . I had an awful time with Dan and the school right up until yr 2 and think that sometimes the attitude of the staff in the school make all the difference. Once he was diagnosed things started to change but he still had the label attached. The new school is very poitive which is why I think there has been such a difference in Dan. Have you got a copy of the handling children with PDA from a schools prospective (Different name to that) do the school have a copy?
    Don't be afraid to speak up
    Good luck
    Donna :D
  • jayne
    Posts: 3
    :? Hi Joanne
    I must agree with you and i think that Team Teach is not the way to go with a 5 year old. These children has enough situations to deal with and if it was me being restrained i would lash out more due to anxiety and not understanding what was being done to me. I could understand it being used on a 10 year plus as they are so much bigger and stronger. If i was you i would discuss all options with your headteacher and senco worker and the one to one and see if they know of any other methods or distractions which could be used in its place. Hope you get a result soon.jayne
  • Pamela
    Posts: 205
    This method was used on Olivia for the first time in this situation. She was totally off the wall and she needed to be put into a safe envirnment for her own safety. The headmaster was there just to observe Olivia at home and because the situation became so dangerous he asked if I needed help. It was at that point that I said yes and together we held her by the top of her arm and lower arm and walked her forcibly to a safe area. Generally she takes herself off after she has thrown or hit something or someone. Like I said before she then stims, which I feel is her coping mechanism for her anxiety. It is really difficult as school never see this behaviour so never have to use any kind of proceedure. Have I mis- interperated the team teach method? How can you manoevre or move a child that is lashing out at everyone and everything, and then has jelly legs and body so you can't pick them up or guide them. I would be interested to hear from any other families who have older children who are nearly if not bigger than themselves.
    Pamela :?
  • joanne
    Posts: 13
    :lol: Thankyou very much for answering my question on handling children we have got dylans review meeting in july Iwill have my stream of questions with me. The norfolk autistic support team goes in to offer help so has dylans peadiatrition ,its just a case of how you word things sometimes to dylan and always thinking one step ahead ,I think the support workers really earn there money dont they.Nice to be back on havent been on as needed a new computer. is www.smartgroups .com finished? from joanne.
  • Just Dandy
    Posts: 19
    Hi
    yes I think it's now through this site mainly although I think some members have still used the old one
    Hope the review goes well
    Donna
  • MHO
    Posts: 111
    Hi Joanne
    I'd never heard of "team teach" but assume from the replies you have received that it refers to a restraining method. Staff at the mainstream school my granddaughter used to attend were instructed in methods of restraint but appeared, on occasions, to be too quick to use them. I certainly agree with Pamela that there are occasions when physical restraint is necessary to prevent a child from harming either him/herself or others and it is clearly wise that the staff concerned should be given instruction in safe methods of such restraint. However, I think it's extremely inadvisable for it to be used as a form of pre-emptive strike every time a staff member thinks a child may possibly be considering some action not approved of. My granddaughter can react quite dramatically to sudden physical contact, which often results in a major panic attack. Distraction, on the other hand, usually works quite well!
  • joanne
    Posts: 13
    Thankyou for sending a message in. Dylan will be going in to year 1 september with a new 1 to1 and a new teacher and Iam going to ask them not to restraint him unless everything else fails I dont know I think they need to think how they are wording things and be 1 step ahead of him to distract him before it gets to out of hand I would say even if they took him for a walk ,but I dont want him refering to being angry = going for a walk now. He is only doing mon tue full days then wed thur fri till 1pm sept he will start full time. Iam interested how old your grandaughter is and how she gets on at school has she, like dylan just got the one diagnossis of PDA joanne.
  • MHO
    Posts: 111
    Hi Joanne
    I hope Dylan will do well in Year 1 when he starts in September. My grandaughter is nine years old now and goes to a special school where most of the pupils have moderate learning difficulties although others are on the autistic spectrum. She loves her school and has regained a lot of her lost self-esteem. She is not considered to have learning difficulties herself but her behaviour is quite challenging. It was first recognised by a perceptive educational psychologist that she probably had PDA when aged six but was not formally diagnosed until she was nearly nine. She was diagnosed at Nottingham last year and was only given the one diagnosis. I hope Dylan can continue to cope with mainstream school. Good luck to him, and to you!
  • Joanne how is Dylan doing in year 1???
  • joanne
    Posts: 13
    Hi all, Dylans doing really well in year one, hes reading really well, joining in unless he doesnt want to but at the moment not to bad. Dylan doesnt like going out to play as he says its to cold,and doesnt like going into assembleys. He has his little outbursts now and then but i think his new 1to1 is very good with him being 1 step ahead of him. :D Iam trying my best to watch everything what and how i talk to dylan as saying the wrong thing can cause upset or anger.When he does loose it which isnt that much at the moment you are on a loser once he has reached that the answer is to try not to get to that stage in the first place but as you all know that is easier said than done. Anyway hope you all have a stressfree christmas from joanne. :D
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